Tuesday, April 15, 2014

DIY craftsman window trim

WHOOT! I finally tackled a DIY project that I’ve been wanting to do FOREVER. But I was afraid…so afraid. I am excited to share it with you – there are a lot of pics so grab some coffee or a Coke and enjoy. :)
In addition to beefy baseboards and door trim, my dream has always been to add chunky trim around our windows. It just adds SO much character, I just love it. But all these years I haven’t been able to do it because our window sills weren’t wide enough. A long time ago I realized I could add some very skinny trim around the window that would match up with the sill:

This is a before I shot quickly before I started three days ago when it was 80 degrees and gorgeous. Today it’s 32 and snowy. But I digress.
To do the trim I wanted to do I’d have to take the whole sill (or stool, as it’s technically called) off and that intimidated me. But then I saw Cristina’s tutorial last summer and I thought it wouldn’t be as bad as I thought. I ended up following her instructions and they worked perfectly!
I actually wanted to do this SO badly at Christmas after we got our tree up. I thought it would look so lovely to have the beefy trim on the windows, but I reeled it in and realized starting this in December was not the best idea. ;)
Fast forward a few months and I finally started! First up, I removed the apron underneath the sill. Fun story – in the CRAZY cold we had this winter the window was iced up and when it melted it went into the wall. That area below the apron was a big bubble of water. Good stuff!:

So first you need to score all the areas (with a razor) that are caulked, otherwise when you pull the trim off it will pull the paint/drywall away:
removing window trim
I freaked for a split second when I pulled it off and thought there was mold:

But it was just overspray from when the room was painted years ago. :) Whew.
Here’s where I forgot to take a pic, but after the apron is gone, you take a crow bar and start pulling up the stool, or the sill. It was actually MUCH easier than I thought it would be. I mean, I’ve stood on these things – I thought they’d be impossible to remove. But they came up pretty fast and easy.
The only issue I had was the ends would start digging into the drywall as I pulled up:

When I worked on one end at a time (instead of trying to pull the whole thing up at once) it helped a bunch. I just focused on one side and got that up and clear of the drywall, then got the whole thing out. I do have to touch up a little drywall there but it’s not bad.
This is the shape of our stool when it was out:
removing window stool
And here’s what it looks like underneath:
removing window sill
I was actually AMAZED that we didn’t have any water issues – our windows get condensation every winter if we don’t adjust our humidifier in the HVAC system just so. And they were covered in ice more than once this past winter. This shows the power of glossy paint and caulk my friends!
After all that I took the skinny trim off the sides of the windows:
removing trim
I kept that all for future projects. I’ve used it on all of the wainscoting in this room.
Then I started the process of building up the new trim. I shared this image when I did my first craftsman door trim and it is so helpful:
  craftsman window trim
I can’t find their size used for the fillet, so I use a trim piece called stop instead. It works great.
Also, our window sills are deeper so I had to use 1 x 8 wood instead of the standard 1 x 5. I followed Cristina’s instructions and used the old sill as my guide for the new one. The only thing you need to keep in mind is your trim that will be on the sides of the windows – mine was 3 1/2 inches and I wanted the stool to stick out a bit from that, so I traced the original onto the new wood, but gave myself four inches:
craftsman window trim how to
Here’s how it looks installed so that makes more sense:
craftsman window trim how to
I followed my traced lines with a jigsaw to cut it out. Don’t worry if the lines aren’t perfect!:
craftsman window trim how to
They will be mostly covered with the new apron and the trim on each side of the window. The parts that aren’t covered are easily fixed with caulk. (My BFF.):
craftsman window trim how to
Putting up the trim is my favorite part! Seeing it come together is awesome. You’ll notice in that pic above that I had to pull off some other trim – more on that in a minute.
I took my sander to the edges of the new sill because this pine has really sharp edges. I do this on all of the door trim I’ve installed too:

I just knock it down a little so it’s not so pointy. If you have a router this would be even better. Then I did one coat of primer and two coats semi gloss paint on everything. I may go back over the stool with a high gloss just to make sure it’s waterproof.
So when I was putting the new trim up I realized the wainscoting I installed years ago was going to be in the way – I had to pull off each box on the wall and reinstall it all to make the new trim work. Total pain in the butt.
Some of it you can’t see, but some areas I still need to putty, sand and paint again:
craftsman window trim
I still need to touch up that area that was a bubble of water too. :)
But that will come later because for now I’m enjoying the new window trim that I love! Whoo hoo!:
beefy trim around windows
I had to pull the chair rail down to do it and I’ve wanted to replace it for a while anyway, so I started installing a new simpler rail:
trim around windows
I only have one wall done so far. I can’t BELIEVE how different the room looks with the beefier trim around the windows.
I took the drapes down before Christmas (you know, thinking I would do this back then), and I don’t know if I can put any back up:
craftsman window trim how to
We’ll see. :)
Here’s a closer look at how the new chair rail, reinstalled wainscoting and new window trim works together:
DIY wainscoting
I still need to clean up the walls a bit like I said, and caulk around the trim up higher, but for now I’m calling it good!:
thick trim around windows
I took one of these images and detailed the wood I used:
how to install new window trim
That should help if you’d like to try this yourself! Remember the 1x2 and stop up on top and the stool on the bottom will be a bit wider than the other pieces. The ones on top are 1/4 inch longer on both sides and the stool on the bottom is 1/2 longer on both ends.
Here’s a shot of the before again:

And here’s the after:
DIY craftsman window trim
Now…I just need to find someone to add the trim to the upper windows. Cause this girl is not doing it. :)
Have you beefed up your window trim? Like everything else, it will take me years to get it done throughout the whole house, but this start makes me happy! Big props to Cristina for her awesome post that gave me the courage to tackle this one! And if you have any questions let me know in the comments – I tried to cover everything but I always forget something.

50 comments:

  1. Love the way you work. The trim is beautiful and your skills are clean and precise. You are so thrifty that you must have gotten a good deal on those roll up blinds in the windows. Can you tell me where you purchased those blinds from? Love the look. Thanks. Mary D.

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  2. This looks SO amazing!! Such a drastic change in the room. Love!

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  3. It looks awesome! I am realizing we don't have any trim on our windows on the main level....but no time for that. We did pull out all the door trim in our upstairs hall and replace with a similar look. The old was beat up and wimpy and ddn't flow with the new board and batten. Brillint last minute (let's make the project take longer) idea on my husbands art. Love this and I am savng it for our garage/mudroom build. No builder grade trim thank you--save me the money!

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  4. Fantastic! We (well, my hubs) are about to do some beefing up in our master bedroom. You have done a great job here! My contractor hubby would be very impressed!

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  5. Swoon!! I fell in luv with you bulkier base boards... how you have me going all over again. Just beautiful!!
    Hugs, Gee

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  6. Oh my goodness, it's gorgeous!! Beautiful trim makes me weak in the knees and is one of my favorite elements when I'm house stalking. ;-) I can't believe what a dramatic difference it makes. And yes, don't you love living in the bipolar Midwest - shorts one day, winter coats the next!

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  7. You're a girl after my own heart! I love moldings, perhaps just as much as you do. The windows look awesome! Thanks tons for the shout out Sarah! :)

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  8. Wow! What an impact for such a subtle change - it looks wonderful. I couldn't put the curtains back up either. Thanks for sharing.

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  9. I really love it on your tall wall. It looks more the size it should be. I am always looking forward to your projects because you make them seem so doable. Great job!

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  10. What a difffernce! Looks amazing! Can you estimate what you spent on this?

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  11. That looks incredible! You break down the instructions and make it seem so doable. Thanks for sharing once again. Nicole

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  12. Wow!!! I am so impressed with your work, I am too chicken to do anything like that. You make it look so easy, it sure cam out beautiful

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  13. What a huge difference! It looks fantastic!!!

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  14. I agree, beefy trim looks amazing! GREAT job!

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  15. It makes such a huge difference, doesn't it? Nice work, it's gorgeous.

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  16. beautiful! did you also put trim on the inside of the window or is that drywall that is painted the same color as the trim? if so, any advice on on that, as far as how close it should be to the window, size of boards, etc.

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  17. Samara (mybeautifulrealities.blogspot.com)April 15, 2014 at 5:37 PM

    Gorg!! Want to come do my windows? :)

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  18. Your previous story about "HOME" really touched me and today, looking at how beautifully you did your windows is so inspirational !! Thank you for sharing with us.
    Turning into a FAN !!
    Naush
    Dubai

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  19. I LOVE it!! I wish I were as brave as you to do projects around my house!!

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  20. That looks amazing! You are so good, I would be so intimidated. You have empowered me to start using some power tools though, I will start small like maybe a nail gun and miter saw. Great job! It looks so nice.

    Tammy @ thecoloreddoor.blogspot.com

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  21. It looks wonderful, like it should have always been that way. Nice job and thanks for the thorough description.

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  22. What a difference! That look beautiful! Now it makes me want to redo all the windows in my home.
    Thanks for sharing.

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  23. I'm impressed. DIY is definitely not my calling. Looks great!

    www.designsbykaty.com

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  24. I love it! What a difference! I live in a craftsman home and have beefy trim on all 60 some windows. (They're small windows and I need light :) Anyway, I only have drapes on a few windows because my husband can't stand the thought of me covering up that beautiful trim :)

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  25. Amazing difference! I admire your skill and DIY perseverance! If I had the nerve I would do something similar. My house was built in the late 1800's. After a fire several years ago, the plaster was ruined by water so all the walls in the house were replaced with dry wall. The guy that did the work put up standard window and wall trim. It would look so fantastic to have the big, wide trim with the "bull's eye" corner brackets as (I am sure) the house did when it was built. As I work both full time outside the home and part time at home, this isn't going to happen. If only my sons had become carpenters instead of teachers!!

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  26. The windows with the new trim look beautiful. Great job!

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  27. That makes SUCH a difference! Looks so great!!

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  28. LOVE...I have beefy trim in most of my windows but I still need to do the two in my dining and living. I have replaced several of my window sills with cultured marble...the stuff they use on vanities. It is awesome, especially if you have "sweaty" windows or forget to close them when it rains (not me, a friend!) http://beckwithstreasures.com/journal/2013/3/15/window-sills
    Super easy project and you install it the same as wood...I probably spent about $25 a piece for them but soooo worth it! Regardless, love your new window treatments!!!

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  29. Chica...you knocked that trim out of the FLIPPIN BALLPARK!

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  30. girrrrrrrrl, that looks SO good! I have a wall of naked windows i've been dying to do that on. Hey, I have an idea...since you're so good at it now, head south and let's work together ;)

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  31. omg that looks amazing .. what a difference!

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  32. Will you marry me? LOL.
    When you said "Craftsman" I thought of our house, and our last house, both of which have been Craftsman homes, and both of which have had much more primitive trim. I'm talking 4 pieces of wide wood, no fancy corners. No "fillet," no cap. I am so impressed. I would've been so scared....

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  33. This looks great! The difference is remarkable.
    Chrissy

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  35. Love the difference! I'd pass on doing the upper windows, too, without some type of rigging!

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  36. Wow, looks so professionally made! Great job you guys!

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  37. You did an awesome job! I don't blame you for feeling a bit intimidated at first. I know I would have. Great pictures too!
    Blessings, Joanne

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  38. They look amazing!!! Great job! Just think of how good it will feel when all of your windows are finished!

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  39. I LOVE the difference, who would have thought?! On a separate note, I'm in the market for 4 curtain panels with those exact colors. If you decide not to rehang them and you would like to sell them, please contact me :) Elizabeth lewisfam5 at bellsouth dot net

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  40. This looks awesome! Our windows don't have any trim (why do houses not have trim anymore??) and I have wanted to do this for so long but was worried about taking the sill off. This makes me think I could do it!! Now to talk my husband into spending the money on wood. BTW, we don't have any saws in our house. What type of saw would you recommend that would be most useful in most home reno? (My hubby wants a saw but doesn't know what type would be most useful and I want to surprise him for Father's day.)

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  41. wow- looks great! thanks for the tutorial!

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  42. Wow!!!! What a difference. Love to read your blog and see what projects you are working on... makes me want to rip apart my house and get some new projects cooking too! ;)

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  43. We did beef up our window trim (well, half of the windows!) and did the exact same thing! I too struggled with hanging my drapes back up after! The trim is so pretty!!!

    http://www.birdsofberwick.com/2013/07/17/new-windows-interiors-this-time/

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  44. Wow! What a difference some wood makes. What kind of wood flooring do you have? It is beautiful!!

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  45. i love the dtriple mirror. where is it from??

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  46. You ARE my hero!! Your "project" turned out wonderfully...what a difference!! I painted mullions recently taking down ALL the window treatments...we are on a hill and quite "private"...I like them off...for now anyway. Fantastic job! franki

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